http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog Paul Shaw Photography: Blog
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/img/s/v-5/u961036187-o96828531-50.jpg 2016-11-19T16:37:00Z (C) Paul Shaw Photography Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2016/11/professional-photography-magazine-online-learning I've been featured in the Professional Photography Magazine

Some months ago I was contacted by a feature writer working for the Professional Photography magazine. She was creating a feature on the different ways you can learn photography. The magazine was interested in where my qualification with the Photography Institute had taken me since I qualified around six years ago.

 

It's been quite a ride, my qualification spurring me onto become a full time professional photographer in the military, working in Afghanistan, Sierra Leone and even for the - as was - Prime Minister David Cameron as the Official Photographer to 10 Downing Street and the Cabinet Office.

 

Have a read through the article below, which has been kindly authorised for me to share on my blog by Professional Photography.

 

If you cannot view the Professional Photography magazine article, please Click Here to view the PDF

 

 

You can buy the full magazine at the Future Publishing website or go direct to the issue here.

Professional Photography Magazine Issue 13Professional Photography Magazine Issue 13Professional Photography Magazine Issue 13

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2016-11-19T15:16:14Z 2016-11-19T15:16:14Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2016/11/remembrance-armistice-day-2016 Remembrance - Armistice Day 2016
"They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them."
 
No10-2014-610-172No10-2014-610-172The UK PM David Cameron attends the EU Council this week. He starts by visiting Ypres, the 'In Flanders Fields' Museum and attends a ceremony at the Menin Gate.
 
 

The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/

 

 

Armistice Day - The First World War officially ended on the eleventh hour on the eleventh day on the eleventh month, 1918. A year later began the act of a Two Minute Silence on the anniversary of Armistice by those who did not want to forget the millions killed, injured and affected.

 

 

The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/

 

 

Now generally called Remembrance Day, people in their millions stop and observe the Two Minute Silence at 11am on 11 November each year in the memory of those who have been affected in all conflicts since that day.

 

 

The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/

 
 
"The Arboretum covers a massive 150 acres"
 

The National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire. The Arboretum is a place of remembrance for both military and civilian personal serving our nation.

The Arboretum covers a massive 150 acres and has a memorial for every service and major unit within the Armed forces and civil services. It was opened in 2001; seven years after its original conception by Commander David Childs CBE who wished to see an established national focus for remembrance.

 
 
 
The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/
 
 
"Stunning piece of architecture"
 
 
The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/
 
 
 

The Armed Forces Memorial honours those members of the Armed Forces (Regular and Reserve) who were killed on duty. 

The Memorial is a stunning piece of architecture. It comprises of a 43 metre diameter stone structure made up of two curved walls and two straight walls. On them the names of those honoured.

 
 
 
The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/
 

The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/

 

Since the end of World War II the men and women of the Armed Forces, often as part of United Nations, NATO or other international coalitions have taken part in more than 50 operations and conflicts across the world.

It’s not just Service Personnel who’ve made the sacrifice. Behind every name on the Memorial are the wives, husbands, partners, parents, children and colleagues who loved them and who live with the pain and consequences of their loss every day.

 

The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/

 

Palestine 1945-48
Malaya 1948-60
Yangtze 1949
Korea 1950-53
Canal Zone 1951-54
Kenya 1952-1956
Cyprus 1955-1959
Suez 1956
Arabian Peninsula 1957-60
Congo 1960-64
Brunei 1962-64
Borneo 1962-66
Cyprus 1964 to present day
Radfan 1964
South Arabia 1964-67
Malay Peninsula 1964-65
Northern Ireland 1969-2007
Dhofar 1969-76
Rhodesia 1979-80
South Atlantic 1982
Lebanon 1983-84
Gulf of Suez 1984
Gulf 1986-89
Pashawar 1989-90
Namibia 1989-90
Kuwait 1991
Iraq/Kuwait 1991-2003
Western Sahara 1991 to present day
Northern Iraq/Southern Turkey 1991
Air Operations Iraq 1991-2003
Cambodia 1991-93
Former Yugoslavia 1992-2002
Sarajevo 1992-96
Georgia 1993 to present day
Rwanda 1993-96
Angola 1995-1997
Croatia 1996-98
Bosnia and Herzegovina 1996 to present day
Kosovo 1998-2002
Sierra Leone 1998 to present day
Sierra Leone 1999-2002
Congo 1999 to present day
Kosovo 1999 to present day
East Timor 1999
Ethiopia & Eritrea 2000 to present day
Macedonia 2001-02
Afghanistan 2001 to present day
Balkans 2003 to present day
Iraq 2003 to 2011
Libya 2011

 

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2016-11-11T10:49:22Z 2016-11-11T10:49:22Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2016/11/i-won-the-british-army-photography-competition-2016 I won the British Army Photography Competition 2016

This is the third year in a row that I have entered the British Army Photography Competition and I managed to bag 1st prize in the Portrait and Best Overall PR Image categories with my 'Army Boxer' image!

 

I have now won the portrait award two years running after just pipping Rupert Frere to the prize.

 

It's an honour to have the opportunity to be able to enter the competition and I feel privileged to have won a prize after competing against some of the most dedicated photographers I know.

 

To see the rest of my entries, check out my other blog post 'My entries to the Army Photographic Competition 2016'

 

Here is the winning Image.

 

Army BoxerArmy Boxer2015 sees the 3rd Battalion The Rifles Inter Company Boxing Tournament kick off with no less than four company teams training to compete for themselves and for the coveted Champion Company title.<br/><br/>Training for the tournament is run over a course of six weeks with three sessions being conducted each day. Sessions include skills lessons, sparring, long runs, circuits and swimming.<br/><br/>The tournament will be comprised of six different weight divisions from Light Welter to Super Heavyweight.<br/><br/>Dreghorn Barracks, the home of 3 Rifles in Edinburgh will be host to the boxing championship and is a strong tradition within the Regiment.

 

Wales Online Article

 

To see more work from other Army Photographers check out our Facebook page and Instagram

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2016-11-01T17:39:34Z 2016-11-01T17:39:34Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2016/10/cambrian-patrol-and-aberfan Cambrian Patrol and Aberfan

What an amazing and privileged week!

 

Over the past five days I have covered the arduous Cambrian Patrol exercise in Wales, photographing soldiers from the Czech Republic, Australia and the UK, been knee deep in mud on the Sennybridge training area, had a run-in with a group of wild horses, photographed Welsh Assembly Members on a VIP visit, had a flight in a Puma helicopter - ticking another mode of transport off of my list - and had the honour and the privilege to be part of the Aberfan memorial service marking 50 years since one of the worst peacetime disasters in British History, which was by far the most important part of the whole week.

 

APOWMID-2016-062-019APOWMID-2016-062-019Scots Guards Guardsman George Hore, Shawn Clarkson and Calum Young.

Patrol Base Green in Rhayader Exercise Cambrian Patrol Phase 5.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP

 

Cambrian patrol is a week long military skills exercise run over rugged mountain terrain in Wales where teams from around the globe compete to win Gold in each of the stages of the event by showing their soldiering skills and military prowess. The competition included a simulated helicopter crash site and Chemical, Nuclear, Biological and Radiological serials.

 

 

APOWMID-2016-062-106APOWMID-2016-062-106Soldiers treat wounded casualties from a simulated helicopter crash.

Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-113APOWMID-2016-062-113Soldiers treat wounded casualties from a simulated helicopter crash.

Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-147APOWMID-2016-062-147Australian soldiers in a harbour area.

Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-149APOWMID-2016-062-149Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-156APOWMID-2016-062-156Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-157APOWMID-2016-062-157Wild horses.

Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-168APOWMID-2016-062-168Czech Republic soldiers carry out personal admin in the harbour area.

Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-183APOWMID-2016-062-183Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-214APOWMID-2016-062-214Soldiers get ready for the CBRN phase of Cambrian Patrol.

Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-222APOWMID-2016-062-222A soldier puts on his respirator.

Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-234APOWMID-2016-062-234Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-062-250APOWMID-2016-062-250A Czech Republic soldier adjusts his helmet strap.

Harbour area and CBRN phases of Cambrian Patrol.

Cambrian patrol is an annual patrol competition.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP

 

Darren Millar AM and David Rowlands AM were just a couple of the VIPs to visit 160th Infantry Brigade during Cambrian Patrol, where they tried out the latest military kit and took a ride in a Puma helicopter.

 

APOWMID-2016-063-030APOWMID-2016-063-030Exercise Cambrian Patrol VIP visit day.

Cambrian Patrol is an annual event where teams from around the world compete to complete military tasks.

Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-063-083APOWMID-2016-063-083A Puma helicopter flown by the RAF was used to take the VIPs on a flight around Sennybridge Training Area (SENTA)

Exercise Cambrian Patrol VIP visit day.

Cambrian Patrol is an annual event where teams from around the world compete to complete military tasks.

Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-063-126APOWMID-2016-063-126Exercise Cambrian Patrol VIP visit day.

Cambrian Patrol is an annual event where teams from around the world compete to complete military tasks.

Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
APOWMID-2016-063-157APOWMID-2016-063-157Exercise Cambrian Patrol VIP visit day.

Cambrian Patrol is an annual event where teams from around the world compete to complete military tasks.

Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP

 

At 0915 on the 21st October 1966, a mountain of coal waste slid into a school and houses in the Welsh village of Aberfan. The disaster, one of the worst in British peacetime history killed 144 people, including 116 children. I had the honour and the privilege to attend the 50th anniversary memorial at the cemetery where the bodies of the victims lay in eternal peace.

 

APOWMID-2016-064-006APOWMID-2016-064-006Brigadier Alan Richmond OBE attended the Aberfan memorial service marking the 50th anniversary of the disaster.

Brigadier Richmond, Commander 160th Infantry Brigade and Headquarters Wales laid a wreath on behalf of the Armed Forces.

In 1966 Soldiers helped with the relief effort in Aberfan in the aftermath of the tragedy.

Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2016-10-23T15:06:40Z 2016-10-23T15:06:40Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2016/10/kent-beach-portraits-sierra-leone Kent Beach Portraits, Sierra Leone

 

 

Earlier today I was looking through my archives and stumbled upon a set of unedited portraits taken at Kent beach in Sierra Leone whilst deployed on operations fighting Ebola. I was scouting for locations for a shoot and exploring the beautiful country a little.

We arrived and made our way to the beach where I met the guys in the photos. Taking the opportunity and great light I captured these portraits before setting down the camera and - randomly - having a game of frisbee with them. I think we lost...

Disc throwing aside, the guys were pretty cool and a good laugh.

 

PS-2015-012-016PS-2015-012-016A portrait taken on Kent Beach.

Sierra Leone has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

The portrait was taken in the shade with the subjects back to the sun using only natural light with no light modifiers or reflectors. They were shot around mid day.
PS-2015-012-009PS-2015-012-009A portrait taken on Kent Beach.

Sierra Leone has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

The portrait was taken in the shade with the subjects back to the sun using only natural light with no light modifiers or reflectors. They were shot around mid day.
PS-2015-012-012PS-2015-012-012A portrait taken on Kent Beach.

Sierra Leone has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

The portrait was taken in the shade with the subjects back to the sun using only natural light with no light modifiers or reflectors. They were shot around mid day.
PS-2015-012-001PS-2015-012-001A portrait taken on Kent Beach.

Sierra Leone has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

The portrait was taken in the shade with the subjects back to the sun using only natural light with no light modifiers or reflectors. They were shot around mid day.
PS-2015-012-005PS-2015-012-005A portrait taken on Kent Beach.

Sierra Leone has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

The portrait was taken in the shade with the subjects back to the sun using only natural light with no light modifiers or reflectors. They were shot around mid day.
PS-2015-012-019PS-2015-012-019A portrait taken on Kent Beach.

Sierra Leone has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

The portrait was taken in the shade with the subjects back to the sun using only natural light with no light modifiers or reflectors. They were shot around mid day.
PS-2015-012-022PS-2015-012-022A portrait taken on Kent Beach.

Sierra Leone has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

The portrait was taken in the shade with the subjects back to the sun using only natural light with no light modifiers or reflectors. They were shot around mid day.

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2016-10-12T21:11:29Z 2016-10-12T21:11:29Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2016/10/my-entries-to-the-army-photographic-competition-2016 My entries to the Army Photographic Competition 2016

 

Here are my entries to this year's Army Photographic Competition, please let me know what you think. (Some are entered more than once)

 

The categories:

 

Portfolio (Consisting of six images - Portrait, Sport, Equipment, Ops & Training, PR, Black & White)

'Tell a Story' (Four images from a single job showing the story)

Portrait

Soldiering

Sport or Adventure Training

Online (Any image on which the public will vote)

 

 

Portfolio One

 

ArmyHq-2015-226-396ArmyHq-2015-226-3962015 sees the 3rd Battalion The Rifles Inter Company Boxing Tournament kick off with no less than four company teams training to compete for themselves and for the coveted Champion Company title.

Training for the tournament is run over a course of six weeks with three sessions being conducted each day. Sessions include skills lessons, sparring, long runs, circuits and swimming.

The tournament will be comprised of six different weight divisions from Light Welter to Super Heavyweight.

Dreghorn Barracks, the home of 3 Rifles in Edinburgh will be host to the boxing championship and is a strong tradition within the Regiment.

PORTRAIT

A 3 Rifles boxer

 

APOWMID-2016-017-143APOWMID-2016-017-143Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright

Royal Corps of Signals corps boxing finals at Gamecock Barracks. Both male and female boxers of carrying weight categories took part in the finals.


NOTE TO DESKS:
Pic Ed -
richard.watt@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382352 - 94391 2352
07836 515306

Dep Pic Ed -
shane.wilkinson@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382351 - 94391 2351
07901 590723

Phot -
Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP
paulshaw@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01952 673695 - 94480 3695

SPORT / ADVENTURE TRAINING

Royal Signals boxers compete against one another

 

SH4_0463SH4_0463Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright

159 Regiment, Royal Logistics Corps take part in Exercise Lion Star where the troops have been developing their leadership skills. The regiment have also taken part in an adventure training package.

NOTE TO DESKS:
Pic Ed -
richard.watt@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382352 - 94391 2352
07836 515306

Dep Pic Ed -
shane.wilkinson@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382351 - 94391 2351
07901 590723

Phot -
Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP
paulshaw@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01952 673695 - 94480 3695

EQUIPMENT

An issued water bottle

 

SH4_0572SH4_0572Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright
Two reserve soldiers take part in a command task designed to test leadership and trust.

159 Regiment, Royal Logistics Corps take part in Exercise Lion Star where the troops have been developing their leadership skills. The regiment have also taken part in an adventure training package.

NOTE TO DESKS:
Pic Ed -
richard.watt@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382352 - 94391 2352
07836 515306

Dep Pic Ed -
shane.wilkinson@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382351 - 94391 2351
07901 590723

Phot -
Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP
paulshaw@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01952 673695 - 94480 3695

OPS & TRAINING

Soldiers carrying out a command task in Cyprus

 

APOWMID-2016-035-033APOWMID-2016-035-033Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright



Almost fifteen hundred soldiers from the Household Division will be on parade to mark the Queen’s Official 90th Birthday on 11th June 2016 on Horse Guards Parade, at the ceremony known as Trooping the Colour. All the Royal Colonels will accompany Her with The Prince of Wales, The Duke of Cambridge, and The Princess Royal riding on the parade.

This year, the Colour being trooped in the presence of Her Majesty The Queen is that of Number 7 Company Coldstream Guards. The Field Officer in Brigade Waiting, Lieutenant Colonel James Thurstan, Coldstream Guards, will command the Parade.

The Soldiers will be on parade in the traditional ceremonial uniforms of the Household Cavalry, Royal Horse Artillery, and Foot Guards. The musicians in the Household Cavalry Band and the Drum Majors will be in their priceless Gold Coats. There will be more than 300 horses on parade, and musicians from all the Household Division Bands & Corps of Drums will march and play as one. The famous Drum Horses of the Household Cavalry Band carrying priceless antique solid silver drums weighing 80lbs each will also be on parade.

Hundreds of hours of training, rehearsal and preparations have gone into making this a world class event fit for a Queen. All those troops taking part are operational soldiers first and foremost and have balanced honing their ceremonial skills with tough combat training at home and overseas. The medals on their chests are testament to their frontline service to the nation.

The immaculately turned out troops start forming up on Horse Guards Parade from 09.15am onwards. Her Majesty leaves Buckingham Palace at 10.45am and arrives on the parade at 11am, returning to Buckingham Palace at 12.20pm.

At precisely 12.52pm Gun Salutes will be fired across the capital: The Honourable Artillery Company will fire at The Tower of London and the Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery will fire from Green Park.

The RAF Flypast dow

'PR'

The Senior Bandmaster of the Massed Bands of the Guards Division

 

APOWMID-2016-043-098APOWMID-2016-043-098Ex Flying Falcon 16 (Ex FF16) is an 11 Signal & West Midland Brigade field exercise run to ensure the competence in the provision of a fully integrated and managed network to enable Command and Control. In addition it is an opportunity to undertake further capability development activity.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright

BLACK & WHITE

A Royal Signals soldier operates a Bowman radio set in the back of an armoured '436' comms vehicle

 

 

 

Portfolio 2

 

ArmyHq-2015-226-131ArmyHq-2015-226-1312015 sees the 3rd Battalion The Rifles Inter Company Boxing Tournament kick off with no less than four company teams training to compete for themselves and for the coveted Champion Company title.

Training for the tournament is run over a course of six weeks with three sessions being conducted each day. Sessions include skills lessons, sparring, long runs, circuits and swimming.

The tournament will be comprised of six different weight divisions from Light Welter to Super Heavyweight.

Dreghorn Barracks, the home of 3 Rifles in Edinburgh will be host to the boxing championship and is a strong tradition within the Regiment.

PORTRAIT

A 3 Rifles boxer

 

APOWMID-2016-029-003APOWMID-2016-029-003Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright
A soldier tears down a track on a mountian bike as part of an adventure training package.
159 Regiment, Royal Logistics Corps take part in Exercise Lion Star where the troops have been developing their leadership skills. The regiment have also taken part in an adventure training package.

NOTE TO DESKS:
Pic Ed -
richard.watt@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382352 - 94391 2352
07836 515306

Dep Pic Ed -
shane.wilkinson@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382351 - 94391 2351
07901 590723

Phot -
Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP
paulshaw@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01952 673695 - 94480 3695

SPORT / ADVENTURE TRAINING

Mountain biking Cyprus

 

APOWMID-2016-048-019APOWMID-2016-048-019Hexamine stoves with burning solid fuel blocks. The blocks are used to heat water in the mess tin, which in turn heats up the sealed ration pack ready meals.

British Asian girls from Huddersfield and Batley shone a spotlight on Army medicine when they visited a military field hospital in York this weekend.

The visit to Queen Elizabeth Barracks, Strensall was arranged by the Huddersfield Pakistani Community Alliance and the Indian and Muslim Welfare Society in conjunction with 4th Infantry Brigade based in Catterick and was designed to give the girls an insight into a career in medicine with an Army flavour.

Hosted by 34 Field Hospital based in Strensall, the girls were shown how to build a temporary shelter called a basha and prepared and ate a Halal operational ration pack for lunch. They were shown a battlefield ambulance and had the roles and equipment of a Combat Medical Technician and field surgical team explained.

After some basic first aid training including resuscitation techniques, they took part in a problem-solving task where they had to put their newly-acquired skills into practice.

34 Field Hospital was the last field hospital to deploy to Camp Bastion in Afghanistan in 2013 and also returned home a year ago from Sierra Leone where military staff ran the Ebola Treatment Centre in Kerrytown.

Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP

EQUIPMENT

Mess tins, Rations and Hexamine stoves

 

APOWMID-2016-038-160APOWMID-2016-038-160Exercising civilian population and public order officers clash on the training area at Llydd.

Members of the Bristol University Officers Training Corps take part in public order training on the defence training estate in Llydd. Officers came face to face with Soldiers from Catterick who were playing as protesting civilians.

The new VIRTUS body armour was tested through the day for the fist time in a public order situation.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright

OPS & TRAINING

Public Order Training

 

APOWMID-2016-035-301APOWMID-2016-035-301Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright



Almost fifteen hundred soldiers from the Household Division will be on parade to mark the Queen’s Official 90th Birthday on 11th June 2016 on Horse Guards Parade, at the ceremony known as Trooping the Colour. All the Royal Colonels will accompany Her with The Prince of Wales, The Duke of Cambridge, and The Princess Royal riding on the parade.

This year, the Colour being trooped in the presence of Her Majesty The Queen is that of Number 7 Company Coldstream Guards. The Field Officer in Brigade Waiting, Lieutenant Colonel James Thurstan, Coldstream Guards, will command the Parade.

The Soldiers will be on parade in the traditional ceremonial uniforms of the Household Cavalry, Royal Horse Artillery, and Foot Guards. The musicians in the Household Cavalry Band and the Drum Majors will be in their priceless Gold Coats. There will be more than 300 horses on parade, and musicians from all the Household Division Bands & Corps of Drums will march and play as one. The famous Drum Horses of the Household Cavalry Band carrying priceless antique solid silver drums weighing 80lbs each will also be on parade.

Hundreds of hours of training, rehearsal and preparations have gone into making this a world class event fit for a Queen. All those troops taking part are operational soldiers first and foremost and have balanced honing their ceremonial skills with tough combat training at home and overseas. The medals on their chests are testament to their frontline service to the nation.

The immaculately turned out troops start forming up on Horse Guards Parade from 09.15am onwards. Her Majesty leaves Buckingham Palace at 10.45am and arrives on the parade at 11am, returning to Buckingham Palace at 12.20pm.

At precisely 12.52pm Gun Salutes will be fired across the capital: The Honourable Artillery Company will fire at The Tower of London and the Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery will fire from Green Park.

The RAF Flypast dow

'PR'

Trooping the Colour, Horse Guards Parade London

 

ArmyHq-2015-226-381ArmyHq-2015-226-3812015 sees the 3rd Battalion The Rifles Inter Company Boxing Tournament kick off with no less than four company teams training to compete for themselves and for the coveted Champion Company title.

Training for the tournament is run over a course of six weeks with three sessions being conducted each day. Sessions include skills lessons, sparring, long runs, circuits and swimming.

The tournament will be comprised of six different weight divisions from Light Welter to Super Heavyweight.

Dreghorn Barracks, the home of 3 Rifles in Edinburgh will be host to the boxing championship and is a strong tradition within the Regiment.

BLACK & WHITE

A boxer from 3 Rifles

 

 

 

'Telling a Story' 1 & 2

 

APOWMID-2016-007-116APOWMID-2016-007-116Credit - Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP (Army)

Mr Chatterton from RAB talks through the condition of one of the flood defence assets in the Attenborough nature reserve.

Servicemen and women from the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force conduct training on iPad applications in support of the nations flood defences.


NOTE TO DESKS:
Credit - Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP (Army)

For More information please contact the Picture Editor, Richard Watt 07836 515306 or Deputy Picture Editor, Shane Wilkinson 07901 590723
APOWMID-2016-007-129APOWMID-2016-007-129Credit - Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP (Army)

Servicemen lead by RAB consultants and the Environmental Agency assess the condition of a pair of flood gates in the Attenborough nature reserve.

Servicemen and women from the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force conduct training on iPad applications in support of the nations flood defences.


NOTE TO DESKS:
Credit - Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP (Army)

For More information please contact the Picture Editor, Richard Watt 07836 515306 or Deputy Picture Editor, Shane Wilkinson 07901 590723
APOWMID-2016-007-137APOWMID-2016-007-137Credit - Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP (Army)

A soldier replaces the cover on a winch which is used to raise the flood gates in the Attenborough nature reserve.

Servicemen and women from the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force conduct training on iPad applications in support of the nations flood defences.


NOTE TO DESKS:
Credit - Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP (Army)

For More information please contact the Picture Editor, Richard Watt 07836 515306 or Deputy Picture Editor, Shane Wilkinson 07901 590723
APOWMID-2016-007-149APOWMID-2016-007-149Credit - Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP (Army)

Servicemen and women from the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force conduct training on iPad applications in support of the nations flood defences.


NOTE TO DESKS:
Credit - Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP (Army)

For More information please contact the Picture Editor, Richard Watt 07836 515306 or Deputy Picture Editor, Shane Wilkinson 07901 590723
FLOOD DEFENCE TRAINING

RAB and the Environment Agency teach soldiers how to check and record flood defences around the UK

 

 

 

APOWMID-2016-038-115APOWMID-2016-038-115Part of the exercising public order squad suit up in VIRTUS.

Members of the Bristol University Officers Training Corps take part in public order training on the defence training estate in Llydd. Officers came face to face with Soldiers from Catterick who were playing as protesting civilians.

The new VIRTUS body armour was tested through the day for the fist time in a public order situation.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright
APOWMID-2016-038-124APOWMID-2016-038-124Soldiers acting as an angry civilian mob congregate outside the Starry Plough inn on the training are at Llydd.

Members of the Bristol University Officers Training Corps take part in public order training on the defence training estate in Llydd. Officers came face to face with Soldiers from Catterick who were playing as protesting civilians.

The new VIRTUS body armour was tested through the day for the fist time in a public order situation.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright
APOWMID-2016-038-215APOWMID-2016-038-215Exercising civilian population and public order officers clash on the training area at Llydd.

Members of the Bristol University Officers Training Corps take part in public order training on the defence training estate in Llydd. Officers came face to face with Soldiers from Catterick who were playing as protesting civilians.

The new VIRTUS body armour was tested through the day for the fist time in a public order situation.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright
APOWMID-2016-038-160APOWMID-2016-038-160Exercising civilian population and public order officers clash on the training area at Llydd.

Members of the Bristol University Officers Training Corps take part in public order training on the defence training estate in Llydd. Officers came face to face with Soldiers from Catterick who were playing as protesting civilians.

The new VIRTUS body armour was tested through the day for the fist time in a public order situation.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright

PUBLIC ORDER TRAINING

Soldiers play both soldier and rioter during public order training in Llydd

 
 

 

Portrait 1 & 2

 

ArmyHq-2015-226-256ArmyHq-2015-226-256Credit to read: Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP
Model Release Signed

Rifleman Ross Webb

2015 sees the 3rd Battalion The Rifles Inter Company Boxing Tournament kick off with no less than four company teams training to compete for themselves and for the coveted Champion Company title.

Training for the tournament is run over a course of six weeks with three sessions being conducted each day. Sessions include skills lessons, sparring, long runs, circuits and swimming.

The tournament will be comprised of six different weight divisions from Light Welter to Super Heavyweight.

Dreghorn Barracks, the home of 3 Rifles in Edinburgh will be host to the boxing championship and is a strong tradition within the Regiment.

ArmyHq-2015-226-396ArmyHq-2015-226-3962015 sees the 3rd Battalion The Rifles Inter Company Boxing Tournament kick off with no less than four company teams training to compete for themselves and for the coveted Champion Company title.

Training for the tournament is run over a course of six weeks with three sessions being conducted each day. Sessions include skills lessons, sparring, long runs, circuits and swimming.

The tournament will be comprised of six different weight divisions from Light Welter to Super Heavyweight.

Dreghorn Barracks, the home of 3 Rifles in Edinburgh will be host to the boxing championship and is a strong tradition within the Regiment.

 

 

 

 

Soldiering 1 & 2

 

SH4_0572SH4_0572Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright
Two reserve soldiers take part in a command task designed to test leadership and trust.

159 Regiment, Royal Logistics Corps take part in Exercise Lion Star where the troops have been developing their leadership skills. The regiment have also taken part in an adventure training package.

NOTE TO DESKS:
Pic Ed -
richard.watt@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382352 - 94391 2352
07836 515306

Dep Pic Ed -
shane.wilkinson@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382351 - 94391 2351
07901 590723

Phot -
Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP
paulshaw@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01952 673695 - 94480 3695
APOWMID-2016-038-160APOWMID-2016-038-160Exercising civilian population and public order officers clash on the training area at Llydd.

Members of the Bristol University Officers Training Corps take part in public order training on the defence training estate in Llydd. Officers came face to face with Soldiers from Catterick who were playing as protesting civilians.

The new VIRTUS body armour was tested through the day for the fist time in a public order situation.


Photographer:
Corporal Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright

 

 

 

Sport or Adventure Training 1 & 2

 

APOWMID-2016-017-143APOWMID-2016-017-143Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright

Royal Corps of Signals corps boxing finals at Gamecock Barracks. Both male and female boxers of carrying weight categories took part in the finals.


NOTE TO DESKS:
Pic Ed -
richard.watt@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382352 - 94391 2352
07836 515306

Dep Pic Ed -
shane.wilkinson@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382351 - 94391 2351
07901 590723

Phot -
Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP
paulshaw@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01952 673695 - 94480 3695
APOWMID-2016-029-003APOWMID-2016-029-003Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright
A soldier tears down a track on a mountian bike as part of an adventure training package.
159 Regiment, Royal Logistics Corps take part in Exercise Lion Star where the troops have been developing their leadership skills. The regiment have also taken part in an adventure training package.

NOTE TO DESKS:
Pic Ed -
richard.watt@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382352 - 94391 2352
07836 515306

Dep Pic Ed -
shane.wilkinson@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01264 382351 - 94391 2351
07901 590723

Phot -
Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP
paulshaw@mediaops.army.mod.uk
01952 673695 - 94480 3695

 

 

 

Online 1 & 2

 

APOWMID-2016-035-033APOWMID-2016-035-033Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright



Almost fifteen hundred soldiers from the Household Division will be on parade to mark the Queen’s Official 90th Birthday on 11th June 2016 on Horse Guards Parade, at the ceremony known as Trooping the Colour. All the Royal Colonels will accompany Her with The Prince of Wales, The Duke of Cambridge, and The Princess Royal riding on the parade.

This year, the Colour being trooped in the presence of Her Majesty The Queen is that of Number 7 Company Coldstream Guards. The Field Officer in Brigade Waiting, Lieutenant Colonel James Thurstan, Coldstream Guards, will command the Parade.

The Soldiers will be on parade in the traditional ceremonial uniforms of the Household Cavalry, Royal Horse Artillery, and Foot Guards. The musicians in the Household Cavalry Band and the Drum Majors will be in their priceless Gold Coats. There will be more than 300 horses on parade, and musicians from all the Household Division Bands & Corps of Drums will march and play as one. The famous Drum Horses of the Household Cavalry Band carrying priceless antique solid silver drums weighing 80lbs each will also be on parade.

Hundreds of hours of training, rehearsal and preparations have gone into making this a world class event fit for a Queen. All those troops taking part are operational soldiers first and foremost and have balanced honing their ceremonial skills with tough combat training at home and overseas. The medals on their chests are testament to their frontline service to the nation.

The immaculately turned out troops start forming up on Horse Guards Parade from 09.15am onwards. Her Majesty leaves Buckingham Palace at 10.45am and arrives on the parade at 11am, returning to Buckingham Palace at 12.20pm.

At precisely 12.52pm Gun Salutes will be fired across the capital: The Honourable Artillery Company will fire at The Tower of London and the Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery will fire from Green Park.

The RAF Flypast dow
APOWMID-2016-035-301APOWMID-2016-035-301Photo: Cpl Paul Shaw ABIPP; Crown Copyright



Almost fifteen hundred soldiers from the Household Division will be on parade to mark the Queen’s Official 90th Birthday on 11th June 2016 on Horse Guards Parade, at the ceremony known as Trooping the Colour. All the Royal Colonels will accompany Her with The Prince of Wales, The Duke of Cambridge, and The Princess Royal riding on the parade.

This year, the Colour being trooped in the presence of Her Majesty The Queen is that of Number 7 Company Coldstream Guards. The Field Officer in Brigade Waiting, Lieutenant Colonel James Thurstan, Coldstream Guards, will command the Parade.

The Soldiers will be on parade in the traditional ceremonial uniforms of the Household Cavalry, Royal Horse Artillery, and Foot Guards. The musicians in the Household Cavalry Band and the Drum Majors will be in their priceless Gold Coats. There will be more than 300 horses on parade, and musicians from all the Household Division Bands & Corps of Drums will march and play as one. The famous Drum Horses of the Household Cavalry Band carrying priceless antique solid silver drums weighing 80lbs each will also be on parade.

Hundreds of hours of training, rehearsal and preparations have gone into making this a world class event fit for a Queen. All those troops taking part are operational soldiers first and foremost and have balanced honing their ceremonial skills with tough combat training at home and overseas. The medals on their chests are testament to their frontline service to the nation.

The immaculately turned out troops start forming up on Horse Guards Parade from 09.15am onwards. Her Majesty leaves Buckingham Palace at 10.45am and arrives on the parade at 11am, returning to Buckingham Palace at 12.20pm.

At precisely 12.52pm Gun Salutes will be fired across the capital: The Honourable Artillery Company will fire at The Tower of London and the Kings Troop Royal Horse Artillery will fire from Green Park.

The RAF Flypast dow

 

The Army Photographic Competition is run annually and is open to all Regular Army and Army Reserve personnel, cadets of the Combined Cadet Force (CCF)Army Cadet Force (ACF)University Officer Training Corps (UOTC Army) and Ministry of Defence civilians who work directly for the Army. It is divided into two categories, amateur and professional.

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2016-10-01T20:40:04Z 2016-10-01T20:40:04Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2016/5/a-year-in-pictures-2015 The year in pictures 2015

It’s almost four years since I became one of the small number of Army Photographers and it has flown by. The job has taken me to Afghanistan, seen me as the photographer to the UK Prime Minister at No10 and win the portrait award at the Army Photographic Competition this year.

 

This past 12 month journey I have exercised as a Combat Camera Team photographer in Poland, Deployed to Sierra Leone on OpGRITROCK to record the events of the fight against the Ebola Virus Disease and covered various events including the military stewards at Wimbledon on my return to the UK.

 

The following images are just part of that journey. 

 

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Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2016-05-13T18:58:15Z 2016-05-13T18:58:15Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2015/4/sierra-leone-part-2-streets-people Sierra Leone, Part 2 – Streets & People

Two months in and I feel honoured to be able to visit a country like Sierra Leone. Since I last wrote about the country I have been on the streets more often and met many more people, been given the thumbs up with a cheer and been shouted at for taking photographs as I pass by. Whether it’s a cheer or a disgruntled yell there is always an underlying joviality, which every citizen that I have met to date naturally possesses. You only have to look around the streets to see this shining through.

Out in the community you are met with inquisitive eyes, happy smiling faces and cheerful heckles. As a soldier it feels strange to be met with such kindness and respect as opposed to the usual hostility I have experienced over the past decade. As a photographer - it bloody brilliant!

Bustling market stalls; loud music, car horns and crazy taxi bikes are just some of the things you will experience while out and about. I have seen street sellers carrying stacks of denim jeans on their heads and have been swarmed by children, attracted to the camera like bees to honey.

Sierra Leone is a colourful, beautiful, positive country. Here are its streets and People.

 

BIKES USED AS TAXIS WAIT FOR A FARE IN FRONT OF MARKET STALLSSierra LeoneBIKES USED AS TAXIS WAIT FOR A FARE IN FRONT OF MARKET STALLS Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

BIKES USED AS TAXIS WAIT FOR A FARE IN FRONT OF MARKET STALLS

 

BIKES USED AS TAXIS WAIT FOR A FARE IN FRONT OF MARKET STALLSSierra LeoneA group of bikers sit and chat near Regent Road in Freetown.<br/><br/>Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

BIKES USED AS TAXIS WAIT FOR A FARE IN FRONT OF MARKET STALLS

 

A MAN POINTS AT ME AND LAUGHS AS I TAKE HIS PHOTOSierra LeoneA MAN POINTS AT ME AND LAUGHS AS I TAKE HIS PHOTO Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A MAN POINTS AT ME AND LAUGHS AS I TAKE HIS PHOTO

 

TWO MEN REPAIR A MOTORCYCLESierra LeoneTWO MEN REPAIR A MOTORCYCLE Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

TWO MEN REPAIR A MOTORCYCLE

 

A POLICEMAN DIRECTS TRAFFIC ON A BUSY STREET NEAR FREETOWNSierra LeoneA POLICEMAN DIRECTS TRAFFIC ON A BUSY STREET NEAR FREETOWN Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A POLICEMAN DIRECTS TRAFFIC ON A BUSY STREET NEAR FREETOWN

 

A MAN POINTING AT A POLICEMAN IN A BUSY MARKET PLACE. MOMENTS LATER THEY WERR ALL LAUGHING.Sierra LeoneA MAN POINTING AT A POLICEMAN IN A BUSY MARKET PLACE. MOMENTS LATER THEY WERR ALL LAUGHING. Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A MAN POINTING AT A POLICEMAN IN A BUSY MARKET PLACE. MOMENTS LATER THEY WERR ALL LAUGHING.

 

A POLICEMAN STOOD ON PATROL AT A BUSY MARKET PLACESierra LeoneA POLICEMAN STOOD ON PATROL AT A BUSY MARKET PLACE Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A POLICEMAN STOOD ON PATROL AT A BUSY MARKET PLACE

 

CHILDREN SWARM AND POSE FOR THE CAMERA WITHIN SECONDS OF SEEING MESierra LeoneCHILDREN SWARM AND POSE FOR THE CAMERA WITHIN SECONDS OF SEEING ME Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

CHILDREN SWARM AND POSE FOR THE CAMERA WITHIN SECONDS OF SEEING ME

 

CHILDREN POUNCE TOWARDS THE CAMERA ON THE STREETS OF FREETOWNSierra LeoneCHILDREN POUNCE TOWARDS THE CAMERA ON THE STREETS OF FREETOWN Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

CHILDREN POUNCE TOWARDS THE CAMERA ON THE STREETS OF FREETOWN

 

CHILDREN POSE FOR THE CAMERASierra LeoneCHILDREN POSE FOR THE CAMERA Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

CHILDREN POSE FOR THE CAMERA

 

CHILDREN PLAY FOOTBALL AT THE SIDE OF A DIRT TRACK ROAD. THEY SPOT ME AND WAVE AT THE CAMERA.Sierra LeoneCHILDREN PLAY FOOTBALL AT THE SIDE OF A DIRT TRACK ROAD. THEY SPOT ME AND WAVE AT THE CAMERA. Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

CHILDREN PLAY FOOTBALL AT THE SIDE OF A DIRT TRACK ROAD. THEY SPOT ME AND WAVE AT THE CAMERA.

 

A CHILD CARRIES A SMALL WHEEL AND TIRE ACROSS A BUSY ROAD WHICH IS IN THE PROCESS OF BEING LAIDSierra LeoneA CHILD CARRIES A SMALL WHEEL AND TIRE ACROSS A BUSY ROAD WHICH IS IN THE PROCESS OF BEING LAID Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A CHILD CARRIES A SMALL WHEEL AND TIRE ACROSS A BUSY ROAD WHICH IS IN THE PROCESS OF BEING LAID

 

A GIRL IN A SCHOOL UNIFORM CROSSES A BUSY ROAD WHICH LEADS INTO FREETOWNSierra LeoneA GIRL IN A SCHOOL UNIFORM CROSSES A BUSY ROAD WHICH LEADS INTO FREETOWN Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A GIRL IN A SCHOOL UNIFORM CROSSES A BUSY ROAD WHICH LEADS INTO FREETOWN

 

A MAN AND WOMAN PASS A BUSY MARKET ON THE SIDE OF THE ROADSierra LeoneA MAN AND WOMAN PASS A BUSY MARKET ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD Locals go about their daily lives on the street of Freetown.<br/><br/>Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A MAN AND WOMAN PASS A BUSY MARKET ON THE SIDE OF THE ROAD

 

TWO WOMEN AND A YOUNG GIRL WAIT TO CROSS A BUSY ROAD. IN THE BACKGROUND A BUSY MARKET PLACE.Sierra LeoneTWO WOMEN AND A YOUNG GIRL WAIT TO CROSS A BUSY ROAD. IN THE BACKGROUND A BUSY MARKET PLACE. Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

TWO WOMEN AND A YOUNG GIRL WAIT TO CROSS A BUSY ROAD. IN THE BACKGROUND A BUSY MARKET PLACE.

 

A MAN AND TWO WOMEN WAIT TO CROSS A BUSY ROAD. IN THE BACKGROUND A BUSY MARKET PLACE.Sierra LeoneA MAN AND TWO WOMEN WAIT TO CROSS A BUSY ROAD. IN THE BACKGROUND A BUSY MARKET PLACE. Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A MAN AND TWO WOMEN WAIT TO CROSS A BUSY ROAD. IN THE BACKGROUND A BUSY MARKET PLACE.

 

A WOMAN LOOKS STRAIGHT AT MY CAMERA AS WE DRIVE PAST LOCAL TAXI BIKESSierra LeoneA WOMAN LOOKS STRAIGHT AT MY CAMERA AS WE DRIVE PAST LOCAL TAXI BIKES Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A WOMAN LOOKS STRAIGHT AT MY CAMERA AS WE DRIVE PAST LOCAL TAXI BIKES

 

SHOPS AT STALLS LINING THE STREETSSierra LeoneSHOPS AT STALLS LINING THE STREETS Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

SHOPS AND STALLS LINING THE STREETS

 

A WOMAN WALKING DOWN A STREET IN A GENERIC STREET SCENESierra LeoneA WOMAN WALKING DOWN A STREET IN A GENERIC STREET SCENE Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A WOMAN WALKING DOWN A STREET IN A GENERIC STREET SCENE

 

BRIGHT COLOURS OF BUSY MARKET STALLS BUSTLING WITH PEOPLESierra LeoneBRIGHT COLOURS OF BUSY MARKET STALLS BUSTLING WITH PEOPLE Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

BRIGHT COLOURS OF BUSY MARKET STALLS BUSTLING WITH PEOPLE

 

A STREET SELLER CARRYING A PARCEL OF DENIM JEANS ON HIS HEAD. THE SELLERS WALK THE STREETS SELLING THEIR GOODS.Sierra LeoneA STREET SELLER CARRYING A PARCEL OF DENIM JEANS ON HIS HEAD. THE SELLERS WALK THE STREETS SELLING THEIR GOODS. Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A STREET SELLER CARRYING A PARCEL OF DENIM JEANS ON HIS HEAD

 

A STREET SELLER SHOWS THE GOODS HE HAS FOW SALE TO A MAN IN A YELLOW T-SHIRTSierra LeoneA STREET SELLER SHOWS THE GOODS HE HAS FOW SALE TO A MAN IN A YELLOW T-SHIRT Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A STREET SELLER SHOWS THE GOODS HE HAS FOR SALE TO A MAN IN A YELLOW T-SHIRT

 

CONSTRUCTION WORKERS STOOD ON MAKESHIFT SCAFFOLDINGSierra LeoneCONSTRUCTION WORKERS STOOD ON MAKESHIFT SCAFFOLDING Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

CONSTRUCTION WORKERS STOOD ON MAKESHIFT SCAFFOLDING

 

A MAN WEARS A HAT FASHIONED FROM A CEMENT BAGSierra LeoneA MAN WEARS A HAT FASHIONED FROM A CEMENT BAG Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A MAN WEARS A HAT FASHIONED FROM A CEMENT BAG

 

Sierra LeoneSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.

The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

STAFF FROM ONE OF SIERRA LEONES EBOLA RESPONSE CENTRES POSE FOR A PHOTO

 

FOUR MEN SIT AT THE SIDE OF ONE OF FREETOWN'S MAIN ROADS. ONE LOOKS BACK AT THE CAMERA.Sierra LeoneFOUR MEN SIT AT THE SIDE OF ONE OF FREETOWN'S MAIN ROADS. ONE LOOKS BACK AT THE CAMERA. Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

FOUR MEN SIT AT THE SIDE OF ONE OF FREETOWN'S MAIN ROADS. ONE LOOKS BACK AT THE CAMERA.

 

TWO MEN GLARE BACK AT ME AS I TAKE THEIR PHOTO. SECONDS LATER THEY WERE SMILING AND LAUGHING.Sierra LeoneTWO MEN GLARE BACK AT ME AS I TAKE THEIR PHOTO. SECONDS LATER THEY WERE SMILING AND LAUGHING. Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

TWO MEN GLARE BACK AT ME AS I TAKE THEIR PHOTO. SECONDS LATER THEY WERE SMILING AND LAUGHING.

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2015-04-09T18:32:54Z 2015-04-09T18:32:54Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2015/3/sierra-leone Sierra Leone

I have been in Sierra Leone for a month and a half and during my time here I have travelled across the north and west of the country and met many people from various backgrounds, both civil and military. The country itself is beautiful with mountains and palm trees in the west and flatter sparser bush land further inland.

Despite its natural beauty in 2014 the country became the centre of attention across the globe as it was hit by an Ebola outbreak, which has killed over 3600 people to date.

What astonishes me is the people’s spirit and resolve to not only embrace the aid, which the international community has given, but also how they help their selves through social mobilisation in order to stand united in the battle against the disease. The countries infrastructure is not as robust as that of more developed countries, nor is the education system, but that does not mean they do not know what needs to be done.

The British Department for International Development (DfID), UK Aid, the British Military and other None Governmental Organisations (NGOs) may have set up treatment facilities and control measures but it is the local people who are doing all the real work. We the taxpayer and fundraisers have merely provided the platform and the launch pad on which to run operations to tackle the disease.

It must also be noted that the country is not only religious, but that an age-old spiritual culture runs deep within the veins of its people. This has lead to illegal burials and washing of infected bodies as part of the victim’s rights of passage. These practices are becoming less and less through education from NGOs, the government and religious leaders supported by the organisation FOCUS 1000.

The West African country gets its name from the hills that surround what is now Freetown, which in 1462 were named “Serra Lyoa”, or “Lion Mountains” by the Portuguese explorer Pedro de Cintra. The country covers over 27,699 square miles and has a population of over six million people with over one million of those living in the capital. The main religion is Islam followed by Christianity and unlike other parts of the world the two religions live and thrive together in harmony.

Sierra Leone is home to the third largest natural harbour in the world and the country has relied on mining, especially diamonds, for its economic base. It is also among the largest producers of titanium and bauxite, a major producer of gold, and has one of the world's largest deposits of rutile. Despite this natural wealth, 70% of its people live in poverty.

In the seventeenth century the British founded the Royal African Company establishing trading posts on the islands of Bunce and York and a century later over 40,000 slaves were returned to Freetown after the abolition of slavery in England.

The 90's brought the Revolutionary United Front (RUF) rebel war that led to the intervention of the International Community led by the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL). The war has been officially over since 2002 and the process of rebuilding Sierra Leone and re-establishing its failed institutions is currently underway.

 

TWO SIERRA LEONEAN FEMALES WALK PAST A SIGN WITH THE "STOP EBOLA" WRITTEN ON ITSierra LeoneA 'National Action Plan for Ebola Eradication' billboard sports the words 'STOP EBOLA' and 'Prevention your best protection'.<br/><br/>Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

TWO SIERRA LEONEAN FEMALES WALK PAST A SIGN DISPLAYING THE WORDS "STOP EBOLA"

 

A MAN WALKS PAST A NATIONAL YOUTH COALITION BANNERSierra LeoneA man walks past a National Youth Coalition banner which welcomes the United Kingdom in the fight against Ebola.<br/><br/>Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A MAN WALKS PAST A NATIONAL YOUTH COALITION BANNER

 

A COUPLE SELL FRUIT IN FRONT OF A PAINTED WALL THAT SPORT THE WORDS "EBOLA STOPS WITH ME"Sierra LeoneA COUPLE SELL FRUIT IN FRONT OF A PAINTED WALL THAT SPORT THE WORDS "EBOLA STOPS WITH ME" Street scenes of daily life around Freetown in Sierra Leone. One million people live in the African country's capital city.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A COUPLE SELL FRUIT IN FRONT OF A PAINTED WALL DISPLAYING THE WORDS "EBOLA STOPS WITH ME"

 

A MAN WASHES HIS HANDS AT ONE OF THE MANY HAND WASH STATIONS DOTTED AROUND SIERRA LEONESierra LeoneA man washes his hands at one of the many hand washing stations that are spread across Sierra Leone.<br/> <br/> Scenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/> <br/> The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A MAN WASHES HIS HANDS AT ONE OF THE MANY HAND WASH STATIONS DOTTED AROUND SIERRA LEONE

 

A COUPLE OF YOUNG MALES GIVE A 'THUMBS UP' AS WE DRIVE PASTSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A COUPLE OF YOUNG MALES GIVE A 'THUMBS UP' AS WE DRIVE PAST

 

A SMALL SHOP PAINTED WITH THE UNION FLAGSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A SMALL SHOP PAINTED WITH THE UNION FLAG

 

Sierra LeoneSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.

The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

THE HILLS BEHIND THE KERRY TOWN TREATMENT UNIT (KTTU)

 

A MAN AT THE SIDE OF THE ROAD IN FRONT OF PALM TREESSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A MAN AT THE SIDE OF THE ROAD IN FRONT OF PALM TREES

 

A HUT DWARFED BY THE HILLS BEHINDSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A HUT DWARFED BY THE HILLS BEHIND

 

A MAN PUSHES A BICYCLE PAST A GROUP OF HOUSES AND SHACKSSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A MAN PUSHES A BICYCLE PAST A GROUP OF HOUSES AND SHACKS

 

PEOPLE QUEUE ON THE CORNER OF A STREET, A SMALL SHOP CAN BE SEEN PAINTED WITH A UNION FLAGSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

PEOPLE QUEUE ON THE CORNER OF A STREET, A SMALL SHOP CAN BE SEEN PAINTED WITH A UNION FLAG

 

A COUPLE OF SMALL BOYS PLAY FOOTBALL TOGETHER OUTSIDE OF A CHURCHSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A COUPLE OF SMALL BOYS PLAY FOOTBALL TOGETHER OUTSIDE OF A CHURCH

 

THE SUNSET BACK LIGHTS THE DUST DOWN A ROAD OUTSIDE OF THE NATIONAL EBOLA RESPONSE CENTRE (NERC) IN FREETOWNSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

THE SUNSET BACK LIGHTS THE DUST DOWN A ROAD OUTSIDE OF THE NATIONAL EBOLA RESPONSE CENTRE (NERC) IN FREETOWN

 

THE WORDS "DO NOT KEEP SICK PERSON AT HOME IT COULD BE EBOLA" ARE PAINTED ON A BLUE TARPAULIN COVERED HUT BEHIND A GROUP OF WOMENSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

THE WORDS "DO NOT KEEP SICK PERSON AT HOME IT COULD BE EBOLA" ARE PAINTED ON A BLUE TARPAULIN COVERED HUT BEHIND A GROUP OF WOMEN

 

ONE OF SIERRA LEONE'S RIVERS TAKEN FROM A BRIDGESierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

ONE OF SIERRA LEONE'S RIVERS TAKEN FROM A BRIDGE

 

A COUPLE OF YOUNG GIRLS CARRY A 'COOL BOX' TOGETHERSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

A COUPLE OF YOUNG GIRLS CARRY A 'COOL BOX' TOGETHER

 

CHILDREN PLAY FOOTBALL ON A BEACH IN FREETOWNSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

CHILDREN PLAY FOOTBALL ON A BEACH IN FREETOWN

 

AN AERIAL PHOTO OF LEICESTER IN FREETOWNSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

AN AERIAL PHOTO OF LEICESTER IN FREETOWN

 

CHILDREN CARRYING TUBS OF WATER FOR THEIR FAMILIESSierra LeoneScenes of daily life from around Sierra Leone.<br/><br/>The country has been the centre of attention for overseas aid since mid 2014 when an outbreak of Ebola started to spread across the country.

CHILDREN CARRYING TUBS OF WATER FOR THEIR FAMILIES

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2015-03-14T17:56:59Z 2015-03-14T17:56:59Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2014/6/trooping Trooping the Colour 2014
Each year servicemen and women from the Foot Guards and Household Cavalry take part in the ceremonial custom of trooping the Colour. 2014 marks the turn of Nijmegen Company Grenadier Guards who's Colour is made from crimson silk and carries 45 of the Regiment’s 77 Battle Honours ranging from 1680 to 1991. The Battle Honour of greatest importance to the Grenadiers is the battle of Waterloo in 1815.
 
The military ceremony dates back to around the seventeenth century when the Colours of the battalion were carried down the ranks in battle so that they could be seen and recognised by the soldiers. 
 
Since 1748 the parade has marked the Sovereign's official birthday and from the reign of Edward VII onwards, the Sovereign has taken the salute in person at Trooping the Colour.
 
 
The ceremony begins with Her Majesty The Queen receiving a Royal salute before personally carrying out an inspection of the troops.

Her Majesty The Queen inspects her troops at the Trooping the Colour parade 2014Her Majesty The Queen inspects her troops at the Trooping the Colour parade 2014Her Majesty The Queen inspects her troops at the Trooping the Colour parade 2014

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN INSPECTS HER TROOPS

 

Her Majesty the Queen inspects her troops at the Trooping the Colour parade 2014Her Majesty the Queen inspects her troops at the Trooping the Colour parade 2014Her Majesty the Queen inspects her troops at the Trooping the Colour parade 2014

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN INSPECTS HER TROOPS

 

The massed bands performing a musical 'troop' playing military music before the Colour is trooped through the ranks.

Senior Drum Major Colour Sergeant Scott Fitzgerald conducts the Foot Guards Massed BandSenior Drum Major Colour Sergeant Scott Fitzgerald conducts the Foot Guards Massed BandSenior Drum Major Colour Sergeant Scott Fitzgerald conducts the Foot Guards Massed Band

THE FOOT GUARDS MASSED BAND CONDUCTED BY SENIOR DRUM MAJOR COLOUR SERGEANT SCOT FITZGERALD

 

The Foot Guards Massed BandThe Foot Guards Massed BandThe Foot Guards Massed Band

THE FOOT GUARDS MASSED BANDS PLAY

 

The Colours being trooped by the Grenadier GuardsThe Colours being trooped by the Grenadier GuardsThe Colours being trooped by the Grenadier Guards

THE COLOURS OF THE GRENADIER GUARDS ARE TROOPED THROUGH THE RANKS

 

The Foot Guards and the Household Cavalry then march past Her Majesty followed by The King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery.

Foot Guards march past the crowds at the 2014 Trooping the Colour paradeFoot Guards march past the crowds at the 2014 Trooping the Colour paradeFoot Guards march past the crowds at the 2014 Trooping the Colour parade

FOOT GUARDS MARCH PAST ON HORSE GUARDS PARADE

 

The famous Bearskin Hat of the Foot GuardsThe famous Bearskin Hat of the Foot GuardsThe famous Bearskin Hat of the Foot Guards THE FAMOUS BEARSKIN HAT

 

The Grenadier Guards form three ranks after trooping the Colour past Her Majesty the QueenThe Grenadier Guards form three ranks after trooping the Colour past Her Majesty the QueenThe Grenadier Guards form three ranks after trooping the Colour past Her Majesty the Queen

FOOT GUARDS FORM THREE RANKS AFTER A MARCH PAST

 

The Colours of the Grenadier GuardsThe Colours of the Grenadier GuardsThe Colours of the Grenadier Guards

THE COLOURS OF THE GRENADIER GUARDS

 

An Officer of the King's Troop, Royal Horse ArtilleryKing's Troop, Royal Horse ArtilleryAn Officer of the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery AN OFFICER FROM THE ROYAL HORSE ARTILLERY

 

A Blues and Royals Captain guards his flanks as he wheels to the left during a march past at the Trooping the Colour parade.A Blues and Royals CaptainA Blues and Royals Captain guards his flanks as he wheels to the left during a march past at the Trooping the Colour parade. A CAPTAIN FROM THE BLUES AND ROYALS MARCHES PAST ON HORSEBACK

 

A Life Guards Captain guards his flanks as he wheels to the left during a march past on the Trooping the Colour paradeA Life Guards CaptainA Life Guards Captain guards his flanks as he wheels to the left during a march past on the Trooping the Colour parade

A CAPTAIN FROM THE LIFE GUARDS MARCHES PAST ON HORSEBACK

 

At the end of the parade the Queen rides in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of her Guards.

Her Majesty the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh Leave Horseguards parade after the Trooping the ColourHer Majesty the Queen and the Duke of EdinburghHer Majesty the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh Leave Horseguards parade after the Trooping the Colour HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN AND THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH LEAVE THE PARADE AND RETURN TO BUCKINGHAM PALACE

 

Her Majesty the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh Leave Horseguards parade after the Trooping the ColourHer Majesty the Queen and the Duke of EdinburghHer Majesty the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh Leave Horseguards parade after the Trooping the Colour HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN AND THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH SMILE AS THEY LEAVE THE PARADE

 

Imagery by Paul Shaw LBIPP.

Copyright © MOD/Crown Copyright 2014, All Rights Reserved

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2014-06-19T06:00:00Z 2014-06-19T06:00:00Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2014/2/kabul-afghanistan Kabul, Afghanistan

The last six months in Helmand, Afghanistan have born witness too many sights and events. One of which was the opportunity to visit the countries capital city-a mere plane journey away.

3,500 years old Kabul is situated in the North East of the country. It is one of the fastest growing cities in the world and is home to over 3 million people. It sits at around 1800m above sea level-roughly 400m higher than Ben Nevis-making it one of the world’s highest capital cities.

After the events of the past decade and beyond, it is quite easy for us to judge Afghanistan and its people. Isn’t it a war torn sand pit whose people care little for their neighbour or their country and simply allow themselves to be overrun by extremists? If you ever have the opportunity to pass through the streets of its capital you’d be surprised.

The city is like two worlds colliding. Corrugated metal buildings are dwarfed by high rise flats. Electricity pylons, transmitter masts, cars… as many cars as any busy city centre, even billboards advertising broadband internet. Ironic when our own country still sports areas out of reach of ultra-fast fibre optics.

I was surprised to see school children in their uniforms going to and from lessons, popcorn being sold from the side of the road and the full body burka being swapped out in favour of the head scarf. It’s a far cry from the visions of many.

It’s a site I may never have the opportunity to see again in my lifetime, so please, allow me to share some of my imagery with you.

Enjoy.

 

Kabul at SunriseKabul at SunriseLooking South over Kabul, Afghanistan at sunrise.

KABUL AT SUNRISE

 

Children ChatChildren ChatTwo boys sit and talk on the streets of Kabul. I wonder what they are discussing?

CHILDREN SIT AND CHAT

 

Local WorkersLocal WorkersTwo local men at work on the streets of Kabul.

LOCAL WORKERS

 

Popcorn StallPopcorn StallA man lights the stove for his popcorn cart on the streets of Kabul.

A MAN LIGHTS THE BURNER ON HIS POPCORN STALL

 

Children walk to schoolChildren walk to schoolChildren on their way to school. One peeks at the camera as we drive past.

CHILDREN WALK TO SCHOOL

 

Bottle ManBottle ManA man rides a bike carrying 3 bags full of plastic bottles. He was nearly driven from the road by a passing car moments before this image was taken.

BOTTLE MAN

 

KabulKabulThe traffic and dusty roads are a bleak contrast to the sign offering broad band internet which stand behind the people in the image.

BROADBAND INTERNET?

 

KabulKabulGiant bill boards and street side shops line the streets of Kabul. KABUL

 

Times of ChangeTimes of ChangeTimes of Change. An Afghan women wears a full Burka and follows another woman who only wears a head scarf. A site which is becoming more and more popular on the streets of Kabul.

TIMES OF CHANGE

 

Re-buildRe-buildTwo young men ride a bike across the central reservation on the streets of Kabul. An advertisement above salutes the rebuilding spirit of Afghanistan. RE-BUILDING

 

BicycleBicycleA man rides a bicycle on the streets of Kabul. Behind is what looks to be a motorcycle garage of some description.

BICYCLE

 

KabulKabulTwo men stand on the streets of Kabul. TWO MEN WALK HOME FROM WORK

 

DebateDebateTwo men debate on the streets of Kabul.

DEBATE

 

BurkaBurkaA woman in a Burka walks by on the streets of Kabul. BURKA

 

School ChildrenSchool ChildrenChildren fill the streets of Kabul on their way to school. The blue of their uniforms stand out in contrast to the sandy environment around. SCHOOL CHILDREN IN UNIFORM

 

Imagery by Paul Shaw.

Copyright © MOD/Crown Copyright and Copyright © Paul Shaw LBIPP 2014, All Rights Reserved

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2014-02-02T09:07:01Z 2014-02-02T09:07:01Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2014/1/afghanistan Afghanistan

During my time in Afghanistan I have seen some amazing sights and had the opportunity to visit a variety of areas including Kabul, the country's capital city. Most of my time has been spent in and around Helmand, one of the country’s largest provinces. It is an arid region in the south of the country covering 22,619 square miles half the size of England.

Archaeologists believe that civilization may have begun in the area as early as 3,000 BC and there is even evidence of human habitation from as far back as 50,000 BC. The country has a deep history and has witnessed many military campaigns, notably by Alexander the Great, Arab Muslims, Genghis Khan, and modern-era Western forces.

In the present day, compared to that of our own, the people of Afghanistan lead a relatively simple life. They are generous and honourable and although not possessing the technology that more developed countries may have, they have ingenuity and a way of making things work. They do things their way and in their own time and for them, it works.

I am now nearing my six month mark and it will soon be time to leave a remarkable country, with remarkable people that have been torn apart by terror.

 

Here is a variety of images from around Helmand.

 

SandstormSandstormA storm approaches Camp Bastion in Afghanistan.

SANDSTORM

 

Rain and SandstormRain and SandstormIn the middle of a rain storm and sand storm as the darkness falls on Camp Bastion, Afghanistan.

RAIN AND SANDSTORM

 

ReconstructionReconstructionA local Afghan construction worker at Lashkar Gah, the capital city of Helmand.

RECONSTRUCTION

 

HerronHerronA Herron with a bad leg looks for water and shade near the Afghan Media Operations Centre (AMOC) on Camp Bastion, Afghanistan

HERRON

 

An Afghan AntAn Afghan AntAn Afghan Ant about 2cm long and very fast rears is body defensively towards the camera.

AN AFGHAN ANT

 

Troops at SunsetTroops at SunsetBritish troops walking at sunset on camp Bastion, OpHERRICK 19, Afghanistan

TROOPS AT SUNSET

 

GunnerGunnerAn American gunner sits at the back of an V22 Osprey over mountains in Helmand, Afghanistan.

GUNNER

 

FOB PriceFOB PricePart of FOB Price depicting various aspects of the base. FOB Price is one of a number of patrol bases that are to be shut down or handed over to the Afghan people once the British complete their operations inthe country.

FOB PRICE

 

Here are a variety of images from around Kabul.

 

Qargha and Kabul at DawnQargha and Kabul at DawnLooking South over Camp Qargha and the Afghan National Army Officer Academy in Kabul, Afghanistan at sunrise.

QARGHA AND KABUL AT DAWN

 

Media OperationsMedia OperationsA professional British Army Photographer captures footage in the hills above the Afghan National Army Officer Academy (ANAOA) in Kabul, Afghanistan.

MEDIA OPERATIONS

 

Black HawkBlack HawkA Black Hawk helicopter above the Afghan National Army Officer Academy which is situated in Kabul, Afghanistan.

BLACK HAWK

 

ANAOAANAOAThe new Afghan National Army Officer Academy buildings under construction in Kabul, Afghanistan.

ANAOA (AFGHAN NATIONAL ARMY OFFICER ACADEMY)

 

Imagery by Paul Shaw.

Copyright © MOD/Crown Copyright and Copyright © Paul Shaw LBIPP 2014, All Rights Reserved

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2014-01-26T18:48:34Z 2014-01-26T18:48:34Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2013/11/remembrance Remembrance
"They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them."
 

The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/

 

 

Armistice Day - The First World War officially ended on the eleventh hour on the eleventh day on the eleventh month, 1918. A year later began the act of a Two Minute Silence on the anniversary of Armistice by those who did not want to forget the millions killed, injured and affected.

 

 

The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/

 

 

Now generally called Remembrance Day, people in their millions stop and observe the Two Minute Silence at 11am on 11 November each year in the memory of those who have been affected in all conflicts since that day.

 

 

The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/

 
 
"The Arboretum covers a massive 150 acres"
 

Last year I was fortunate enough to visit the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire. The Arboretum is a place of remembrance for both military and civilian personal serving our nation.

The Arboretum covers a massive 150 acres and has a memorial for every service and major unit within the Armed forces and civil services. It was opened in 2001; seven years after its original conception by Commander David Childs CBE who wished to see an established national focus for remembrance.

 
 
 
The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/
 
 
"Stunning piece of architecture"
 
 
The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/
 
 
 

The Armed Forces Memorial honours those members of the Armed Forces (Regular and Reserve) who were killed on duty. 

The Memorial is a stunning piece of architecture. It comprises of a 43 metre diameter stone structure made up of two curved walls and two straight walls. On them the names of those honoured.

 
 
 
The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/
 

The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/

 

Since the end of World War II the men and women of the Armed Forces, often as part of United Nations, NATO or other international coalitions have taken part in more than 50 operations and conflicts across the world.

It’s not just Service Personnel who’ve made the sacrifice. Behind every name on the Memorial are the wives, husbands, partners, parents, children and colleagues who loved them and who live with the pain and consequences of their loss every day.

 

The National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial ArboretumThe National Memorial Arboretum is the UK's year-round centre of Remembrance; a spiritually uplifting place which honours the fallen, recognises service and sacrifice, and fosters pride in our country. It is a living and lasting memorial.

It commemorates and celebrates those who have given their lives in the service of their country, all who have served and suffered as a result of conflict, and others who, for specific or appropriate reasons, are commemorated here.

The Arboretum is a charity run by staff and volunteers, and part of The Royal British Legion family. We receive around 300,000 visitors a year, including Service personnel, veterans, students of all ages, and groups.

There are over 200 special events held here each year. The Act of Remembrance, including a Silence, is observed daily in the Millennium Chapel.

The Arboretum is home to the striking Armed Forces Memorial which commemorates those who have been killed on duty or as a result of terrorism from the end of the Second World War to the current conflict in Afghanistan.

For more information go to http://www.thenma.org.uk/

 

Palestine 1945-48
Malaya 1948-60
Yangtze 1949
Korea 1950-53
Canal Zone 1951-54
Kenya 1952-1956
Cyprus 1955-1959
Suez 1956
Arabian Peninsula 1957-60
Congo 1960-64
Brunei 1962-64
Borneo 1962-66
Cyprus 1964 to present day
Radfan 1964
South Arabia 1964-67
Malay Peninsula 1964-65
Northern Ireland 1969-2007
Dhofar 1969-76
Rhodesia 1979-80
South Atlantic 1982
Lebanon 1983-84
Gulf of Suez 1984
Gulf 1986-89
Pashawar 1989-90
Namibia 1989-90
Kuwait 1991
Iraq/Kuwait 1991-2003
Western Sahara 1991 to present day
Northern Iraq/Southern Turkey 1991
Air Operations Iraq 1991-2003
Cambodia 1991-93
Former Yugoslavia 1992-2002
Sarajevo 1992-96
Georgia 1993 to present day
Rwanda 1993-96
Angola 1995-1997
Croatia 1996-98
Bosnia and Herzegovina 1996 to present day
Kosovo 1998-2002
Sierra Leone 1998 to present day
Sierra Leone 1999-2002
Congo 1999 to present day
Kosovo 1999 to present day
East Timor 1999
Ethiopia & Eritrea 2000 to present day
Macedonia 2001-02
Afghanistan 2001 to present day
Balkans 2003 to present day
Iraq 2003 to 2011
Libya 2011

 

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2013-11-08T14:31:24Z 2013-11-08T14:31:24Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2013/10/combatcamera Combat Camera Team

"You a photographer?... I'm a combat correspondent... Well, you seen much combat?... I've seen a little on TV..."

 

While not quite Full Metal Jacket the Combat Camera Team is there to film and capture history in combat if the need arises. We are all fully trained soldiers.

As some of you may know from reading my Bio page, I am a professional photographer in the British Army. I am currently serving as part of a small team who make up the Combat Camera Team (CCT) in Afghanistan, a position which is voluntary and only available to military photographers.

Photography has always played a big part in the Army dating back to 1915 and is now a trade group with the Royal Logistics Corps (RLC). Predominantly stills photographers, we also specialise in Electronic News Gathering (ENG) which is the role I have for the current 6 month operational tour.

The photographic expertise of the "trade" spread the full spectrum from Royalty to technical Equipment and Combat but our main focus is on media output and historical archiving. For more information check the British Army Photographers Facebook Page

I have recently had a 'Hometown Story' published in the 'Huddersfield Examiner' and the 'Yorkshire Post' which tells a little about me and the job I am doing in the desert. I have posted it below.

 

Sergeant Paul ShawSergeant Paul ShawImage remain crown copyright. Photo credit to read - Sergeant Dan Bardsley RLC (Phot)

Image by Sgt Bardsley RLC (Phot). © MOD/Crown Copyright

 

 

A Huddersfield soldier serving in Afghanistan is capturing history as the British relinquish security control in Helmand Province to the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF).

Sergeant Paul Shaw a former pupil of Newsome High School, is an Army photographer based in Camp Bastion and is part of a three man Combat Camera Team (CCT).

The CCT consists of a team leader, photographer and video operator. They follow troops out on the ground and around various bases throughout Helmand, covering the transitional work and the handover of control to the ANSF.

The team, because of their military training, can capture events across parts of Helmand Province where the mainstream media may not be able to go, and therefore keeping the public informed of the work of the British Forces.

Paul joined the Royal Signals Corps ten years ago, but switched to the Royal Logistics Corps in 2012 to pursue his passion for photography. 

“I have always had a creative eye, and an interest in photography. I had reached the top of my trade and had to either change trade or Corps in order to progress any further.”

In the UK Paul is based at the Defence Media Operations Centre (DMOC), RAF Halton. This is home to an operational unit that deploys at short notice around the world.

In his spare time Paul enjoys climbing and martial arts, and also runs his own photography business. The environment that he is working in for the next six months comes with its own set of challenges he said:

“The biggest challenge is trying to film whilst wearing the same kit as an infanteer, and being aware of our surroundings at all times.”

When he returns from the tour in March 2014, Paul will build upon the experience he has already gained from his time at DMOC. In the future he hopes pursue his passion for photography and break into the commercial field.

 

Words by Lieutenant Claire Jackson RLC

 

 

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2013-10-04T17:34:12Z 2013-10-04T17:34:12Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2013/8/apassionawakens A Passion Awakens - Nedile Lodge

Deep inside continental Africa sits a small Safari lodge surrounded by savanna woodlands. Nedile Lodge, pronounced [Neh-dee-lay] is situated in the Welgevonden game reserve in the Limpopo territory in South Africa near the borders of Botswana and Zimbabwe. Although a five star lodge, you would be forgiven for thinking wide screen televisions, wi-fi and background music at every turn.

No; Nedile is a fresh and real outdoor experience.

 

"not to be missed for the world"

 

My partner and I spent three nights at Nedile during a longer stay in South Africa. It was to be my first Safari and although a great fan of Sir David Attenborough and his countless naturalist programmes, I wasn't sure what to expect. The only thing on my mind was the prospect of some cracking imagery rather than an encounter with a lion or an elephant.

20 hours of travelling including tube train, 11 hour flight and 4 hour drive saw us arrive at the reserve where we immediately 'signed our lives away...' Great.

Here we met our ranger, Barend and his mighty British Land Rover—Hurrah. Once at the lodge we had a couple of hours to freshen up and have lunch before heading straight out on our first drive—beyond tired—but not to be missed for the world!

 

"we keep our distance, quietly, in a canvas topped Land Rover"

 

Our first drive not only introduced us to 'sundowners' and an amazing sunset, but gave us our first glimpse at 'three of the five.'

 

Two lion cubs sit and stare at the camera

LION CUBS

As I took this shot of two lion cubs I awoke a new passion.

A large Elephant bull stares back at meSavanna (African) Elephant

SAVANNA (AFRICAN) ELEPHANT

A large bull elephant stares back at me while we keep our distance, quietly, in a canvas topped Land Rover.

A white rhino stands among the winter grass

SQUARE-LIPPED (WHITE) RHINOCEROS

This little fellow—half the size of the vehicle—stands quietly among the grass of an open plain.

 

It was not until my last evening at the lodge that the fourth of the five was spotted. A Buffalo. An old male with sores on his front legs, probably ejected from his herd.

 

A Buffalo eating grass

AFRICAN (SAVANNA) BUFFALO

 

South Africa boasts a great variety of wildlife and is home to the famous 'Big Five.' These are the Lion, Leopard, Elephant, Buffalo and Rhino which were said to be the most dangerous animals to hunt back when we knew little about the damage we could cause the world. Each year people travel from around the globe just to see them, often not interested in the other wildlife on offer. 

Although I did not see a leopard, we will most certainly have driven passed several. Oh well; just one of many reasons to head back out there.

 

A Giraffe stares back at me as I take it

GIRAFFE

Two zebras in the middle of the savanna

PLAINS ZEBRA

Blue Wildebeest travel across the savanna

BLUE WILDEBEEST

A greater kudu looks back as it senses my presence

GREATER KUDU

Impala cross the road in front

IMPALA

A curious warthog

WARTHOG

A hyrax smiles at me

ROCK HYRAX (DASSIE)

A common waterbuck stares at me

COMMON WATERBUCK

A tsessebe walks by

TSESSEBE

A klipspringer

KLIPSPRINGER

A black-backed jackal

BLACK-BACKED JACKAL

Three lion cubs play

LION CUBS

A bird in flight

A BIRD IN FLIGHT

A dung beetle dung ball

DUNG BEETLE DUNG

A lions paw print

LION PAW PRINT

 

"big smiles and a hearty breakfast"

 

Nedile Lodge sits in the heart of the Welgevonden game reserve and boasts some of the best panoramic views the area has to offer. The lodge can house up to ten guests with seven amazing staff who really know their stuff.

The days consist of a 0600 wake up call with coffee and 'crunchies' (biscuits), then in the vehicle by 0630 for the morning drive. The first drive lasts for around four hours with a fifteen minute stop for bush coffee and crunchies, arriving back at 1030. 

Upon your return you are pleasantly greeted by hot face towels, big smiles and a hearty breakfast on the balcony of the lodge overlooking a watering hole. Your time is then your own to use the pool, watch the many animals and admire the views, or have a drink or three until a beautiful lunch at 1400.

Your evening drive sees you in the vehicle at 1515 to catch a radiant sunsetwhilst sipping 'sundowners,' eating dried fruits and meats with crunchies before breaking out the spotlight for some nocturnal wildlife.

Finally you return after dark, greeted in the same manner and treated to some of the best food South Africa has to offer.

 

A beautiful sunset

 

"an experience not to be missed"

 

Nedile has been one of the best experiences of my life. The relaxed and highly skilled staff should be highly commended and although I did not get to know everyone personally, I would like to express my thanks to all at the lodge.

I also had the privilege of meeting the ownerswho built the lodge just over ten years ago. Amazing, down to earth visionary people who have brought the wonders that are Nedile into being. It is an experience not to be missed.

 

I now have the Safari bug. Who knows what the future may hold...

 

 

My partner ad I stand in front of our safari wagon

 

 

 

References

Nedile Lodge

Welgevonden Game Reserve

Medway Leisure Travel

Mammals of Southern Africa Pocket Guide Book

Bush Coffee made with Amurula, Coffee and Hot Chocolate

Sundowners

 

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2013-08-23T19:06:13Z 2013-08-23T19:06:13Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2013/6/nightclub-photography-salisbury Nightclub Photography - Where It all Began

 

"a great amount of enthusiasm needs to be thrown into every group as you push a camera into their personal space"

 

I started my professional career as a nightclub photographer in various clubs in Salisbury, Wiltshire where I shot images for their websites. This gave them the opportunity to sell their clubs vibe and show the antics of their patrons from the previous night to attract a greater clientele.

 

"Your kit also takes a good beating"

 

Nightclub photography presents it's own challenges, alcohol being top of the list. Dealing with and photographing drunken men and women can go one of two ways and a great amount of enthusiasm needs to be thrown into every group as you push a camera into their personal space, while at the same time trying to not be overwhelming.

 

"Sigma 28mm 1.8D EX DG Macro lens"

 

Your kit also takes a good beating, from the crowds on the dance floor to the beer and sticky cocktails that they manage to spill onto your camera most nights that you are there. I started off with a D700 and moved quickly onto a D3 with a Sigma 28mm 1.8D EX DG Macro lens and SB-600. The Sigma is the perfect lens for the clubs, it's light weight and does not stick out far from the camera body.

 

Unfortunately one of the clubs where I started my career no longer exists since the Great British Recession however I am pleased to say that the Chapel Nightclub, Salisbury's main club, is still going strong. www.chapelnightclub.co.uk

 

Here are some portraits taken at the events the nightclubs ran during my time there. Skepta is among them.

 

A clubber shows his moves on the dance floor in the Warehouse Nightclub in Salisbury.Dance Floor MovesA clubber shows his moves on the dance floor in the Warehouse Nightclub in Salisbury.

 

Skepta performing in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.SkeptaSkepta performing in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.

 

Two Young Clubbers in Fancy DressTwo Young Clubbers in Fancy DressTwo Young Clubbers in Fancy Dress in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.

 

A Portrait of a Clubber in Fancy Dress in the Warehouse Nightclub in Salisbury.A Portrait of a Clubber in Fancy DressA Portrait of a Clubber in Fancy Dress in the Warehouse Nightclub in Salisbury.

 

A Portrait of a Clubber in the Warehouse Nightclub in Salisbury.A Portrait of a Clubber in the WarehouseNightclub in Salisbury.A Portrait of a Clubber in the Warehouse Nightclub in Salisbury.


Two Clubbers in Fancy Dress in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury. The Female is dressed as a devil.Two Clubbers in Fancy Dress in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.Two Clubbers in Fancy Dress in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury. The Female is dressed as a devil.

 

DJ Karl West at work in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.DJ Karl West at work in the Chapel Nightclub.DJ Karl West at work in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.

 

The Bar in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.The BarThe Bar in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.

 

A portrait of a clubber in fancy dress in the Warehouse Nightclub in Salisbury.A portrait of a clubber in Fancy Dress.A portrait of a clubber in fancy dress in the Warehouse Nightclub in Salisbury.

 

Skepta Perform on stage in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.Skepta Perform on stage in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.Skepta Perform on stage in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.

 

DJ Karl West at work in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.DJ Karl WestDJ Karl West at work in the Chapel Nightclub in Salisbury.

 

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2013-06-09T08:00:00Z 2013-06-09T08:00:00Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2013/6/fashion-shoots Fashion Shoots

Sometimes it's a good idea to re-visit your previous work, not only to scrutinise it and better yourself as part of a progression but also to admire it with a fresh mind and perhaps boost your own ego. The latter doesn't always happen if you have an ever changing or evolving style however. Never the less, don't be afraid to display your old works from time to time.

After rummaging around my archives and older blog posts I came across a few old fashion shoots, some of which I still love and some of which I would alter if I was to re-visit the projects again.

The next four photos are shots of Lauren Crampton and were taken in studio. The session was a fashion and portraiture shoot with two changes of clothing. I still love this set of images.

 

A young woman in a white dress and brown belt in studio.Fashion PhotographyA young woman in a white dress and brown belt in studio.

 

A young woman in a black net top and black skirt with red belt in studio.Fashion PhotographyA young woman in a black net top and black skirt with red belt in studio.

 

A young woman in a white dress and brown belt in studio.Fashion PhotographyA young woman in a white dress and brown belt in studio.

 

A young woman in a black net top and black skirt with red belt in studio.Fashion PhotographyA young woman in a black net top and black skirt with red belt in studio.

 

 

This following set was taken in an old dairy farm in Wales. I would love to return to this site with a full set of on location lighting as originally I used an off camera SB-600 flash bounced off of a silver reflector to light the subject. This, however is no longer possible as the site is now an estate of modern housing. The shoot was fashion and portraiture with a few changes of outfit throughout.

 

A young girl poses in a doorway on an on location fashion shoot in an old dairy farm.Fashion Photography on LocationA young girl poses in a doorway on an on location fashion shoot in an old dairy farm.

 

A young girl poses sat on a mattress for an on location fashion shoot outside an old dairy farm.MattressA young girl poses sat on a mattress for an on location fashion shoot outside an old dairy farm.

 

A young girl poses in front of an old wall where the paint is flaking away for an on location fashion shoot at an old dairy farm.FashionA young girl poses in front of an old wall where the paint is flaking away for an on location fashion shoot at an old dairy farm.

 

 

The last shoot of this post is of Ben Heneghan (TheZIllaz Lead Singer) and Lauren Faye Morrison and is a shoot that I would like to re-visit. I shot the pair at two separate locations within the same morning. The first at an old mill and the second in an old car garage in Huddersfield.

 

a Fashion shoot of the lead singer from The Zillaz.Fashiona Fashion shoot of the lead singer from The Zillaz.

 

a Fashion shoot of the lead singer from The Zillaz and a young female model.Fashiona Fashion shoot of the lead singer from The Zillaz and a young female model.

 

a Fashion shoot of the lead singer from The Zillaz and a young female model.Fashiona Fashion shoot of the lead singer from The Zillaz and a young female model.

 

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2013-06-04T22:15:18Z 2013-06-04T22:15:18Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2013/3/digital-workflow-file-structure Digital Workflow: File Structure and 3 Folder System

"Starting early will save you a lot of pain in the future"

 

One of the biggest problems for photographers is their digital workflow. Organisation of their files and folders into a logical structure and using naming conventions that make sense. For someone who is starting out in photography or those who are not very computer literate, this can sometimes seem daunting. Starting early will save you a lot of pain in the future.

 

File Naming: Problems

Deciding on a name for your imagery can be an absolute nightmare. Creating a big long file name combining the shoot name and the date seems the logical solution when looking back through your work. The problem with long file names become apparent when trying to view them on screen or when copying them to CD/DVD's for archiving. Keeping them in order can also cause some people problems.

On screen your computer tends to 'clip' long file names making them unreadable. You can get around this by changing your folder view, but this takes extra time eating into your already tight deadline.

When burning your files to a CD/DVD most burning software only allows 127 characters in length to comply with ISO (International Standards Organisation) standards and believe it or not, 127 characters can easily be swallowed up by some imaginative users.

Finally, ordering your files and folders can also cause some people issues. Computers order their filenames by the first character then the second, then the third and so on.

 

"Your meta data contains the date information"

 

File Naming: Best Practice

Folder StructureFolder StructureThe 3 Folder Digital Workflow System

There is a simple solution to all of these issues and I shall try and be brief.

- Choose a folder in which to keep all your images. A folder called "Pictures" is perfectly fine.

- Name folders with the date and shoot number backwards: 20130301 (YearMonthShootNumber)

Start with the year and then the month using a 4 digit year and 2 digit month format (YYYYMM). The final 2 digits are the shoot number and not the date. Your meta data contains the date information and if you do more than a single shoot in a day this allows you to separate them out. The same as storing negatives.

- Add a short description: 20130301 - Smith Wedding, 20130302 - Kate H Fashion and Portrait

- Add an image number and remove the description on files within the folders: 20130301-001, 201301-002, 201303-003

 

"a logical and organised way of storing our images"

 

Three Folder System

So far we have created ourselves a logical and organised way of storing our images but we have not discussed how we can use this for workflow. How we edit our "Original" images, saving an "Edit" copy and and a resized "Output" copy will be covered in another blog post, but for now all we have to do is create a "RAW", "Edit" and "Output" sub folders within our main shoot folder.

This allows us to keep our work all in one place but our file versions separate.

 

Backups

All that is left to do is keep regular backups by copying them to another drive or CD/DVD or using a backup program.

 

Enjoy!

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2013-03-11T13:07:37Z 2013-03-11T13:07:37Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2012/10/the-old-boys-village The Old Boys Village

The Old Boys Village

Located near St.Athan, a town just west of Barry in the vale of Glamorgan, the Boys Village is a curious collection of decaying buildings including a chapel, gym, dining hall and varying styles of accommodation. Opened in 1930, and built by the Ocean Coal Company welfare committee, the camp provided a summer retreat for boys from mining communities in the valleys to the north, a place where they could learn skills and express themselves without getting up to too much mischief. Also, the beach was close by.

As the site developed over time, it also became a place of learning for older youth studying apprenticeships. Nationalisation of the coal industry saw ownership of the village taken up by the ‘Boys Clubs Movement’, an organisation that supported working boys from the ages of 14 to 18, all across the UK. Time spent at the village needed to be paid for, and the decline of the mining industry exacted a heavy toll on the village, the income of valley communities suffering terribly. The site was finally closed in the early 90′s. Despite remaining in allegedly good condition for many years, in the last 12 months (particularly) the buildings have been heavily vandalised, and demolition work has also now started.

 
The Black Mountains Website (2012), Urbex:Tunnels:Industry,  Blackmountains.co.uk
 
 
 
Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2012-10-01T21:10:39Z 2012-10-01T21:10:39Z
http://www.paulshawphotography.co.uk/blog/2012/8/victorian-portraits Victorian Portraits

Victorian Portraits

Blists Hill Victorian Town is an open air museum in Telford, Shropshire. It has actors, actresses and volunteers bringing the town to life and is one of ten museums that are run by the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust.

Blists Hill Website

 

Blists Hill Candle MakerCandle Maker

A PORTRAIT OF A CANDLE MAKER USING A SIGNLE OFF CAMERA FLASH

 

Blists Hill Engine DriverBlists Hill Engine Driver

A PORTRAIT OF AN ENGINE DRIVER USING A SINGLE OFF CAMERA FLASH

 

Blists HillBlists Hill

A PORTRAIT OF A TANNER USING A SINGLE OFF CAMERA FLASH

 

Blists Hill PrinterBlists Hill Printer

A PORTRAIT OF AN APPRENTICE SCREEN PRINTER USING A SINGLE OFF CAMERA FLASH

 

Blists Hill Post Office WorkerBlists Hill Post Office Worker

A PORTRAIT OF A POST OFFICE WORKER USING NATURAL LIGHTING

 

Blists Hill PortraitBlists Hill Portrait

A PORTRAIT OF A FEMALE FROM THE VICTORIAN PERIOD USING NATURAL LIGHT

 

Paul Shaw Photography paul@paulshawphotography.co.uk (C) Paul Shaw Photography 2012-08-14T18:17:08Z 2012-08-14T18:17:08Z